Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Your ideas please!


This was the backdrop to the fence in my side yard until last fall.

This is the backdrop after the neighbors removed the trees.
I am looking for ideas on how to undo at least some of the damage.  I know that I can't replace all of those trees and that I'll never have that wonderful overhang again.  But surely there is something I can do to ease the pain.  Ideas anyone?


8 comments:

Curbstone Valley Farm said...

Not sure this will help. I had a similar fence situation at my last house. We added a 2 foot lattice extension to the top of the fence, and grew a Bower vine (evergreen) over the fence. It filled in most of the space in its first year. Was green all year, and the blooms in summer were beautiful. Because it grew so thick, it almost created a sort of grotto-like area across the top of the fence.

flowergardengirl said...

Oh my goodness, I'm so sorry. This happened to me at a former home and really devastated some of my shade plants. I will come back if I think of something.

. . . Lisa and Robb . . . said...

Grow Hops?

They grow up poles, and get HUGE.

Hocking Hills Gardener said...

Oh dear that does change the sun to your flower beds and the view looking right into their roof. I would go higher with lattice and grow vines. It would be the fastest way. Other than that your may want some trees or bushes which will take longer.I am sure someone will have some great ideas for you.

Benjamin Vogt said...

Why did they take out the trees? WHY? Oh I feel the pain in my side. (glad you found my blog!)

Gail said...

I am heartbroken for your garden...I am wondering the same thing Benjamin
asked! Why? I am sorry I haven't any suggestions~~gail

Laurrie said...

Oh my, what a change. River birches grow very rapidly. They have a woodsy look that would make it very naturalistic along the fence, maybe plant 3 or more staggered. You won't get the overhang of branches from the other side, but a river birch will quickly get to the top of the fence and beyond. I think they'd be a nice complement to your curvy naturalistic garden, and you'll get quick height.

garden girl said...

I can definitely understand how you feel about the loss of the neighbor's trees. It's hard to understand, and I find myself asking why as well.

Our neighbor behind us had a huge weeping willow that was hit by lightning before I moved here seven years ago. It fell a couple of years ago during a winter storm. It didn't affect our shade since it was north of us, but the loss of privacy was awful.

We put a river birch on our side, and I agree with Laurrie - they're wonderful, fast growing native trees. I found ours at a big box store for under $30. It's more than doubled in size in just two years. They are so pretty with their peeling, cinnamon-colored bark, and provide nice, dappled sunlight. I might do a river birch, and maybe a couple of blooming trees like magnolia and/or a fruit tree or two.